Thursday, 2 June 2016

Google Chrome will Start Blocking Flash by Default

Flash

Google Chrome Stop Support to Adobe Flash Player


Chrome browser of Google will stop its support to Adobe’s Flash Player on almost all websites by the end of this year. Staff member, Anthony LaForge while posting to Google groups, had defined the plan of the company to stop automatically permitting Flash to run on websites. The plan intended to be implemented by the fourth quarter of 2016 would be seeing HTML5 replacing Flash as a much integrated media experience with quicker load times and less power consumption.

LaForge had mentioned that `if a site offers an HTML5 experience, this change would make that the main experience’. They will continue to ship Flash Player with Chrome and if a site really needs Flash, a prompt would be appearing at the top of the page when the user first tends to visit that site, providing the options of allowing it to run for that site. But the top ten website utilizing Flash would not have it disabled, according to Google. Presently the ten biggest website as per Google are Amazon, YouTube, Facebook, V.K.com, Yahoo, Live.com, Yandex.rv, OK.ru, Twitch.tv and Mail.ru, though these may be changing towards the end of the year.

Proposal Document Outlining Change


Whitelisted websites would be having their Flash use secured for a year though it will also be reviewed during a period of 12 months. Proposal document outlining how the change would take place had been online by LaForge:

  • Flash would still be bundled with Chrome though would not be advertised by default 
  • If HTML5 is provided by a website, Chrome would automatically default to it 
  • If Flash Player is essential, a user would be prompted 
  • When a user accepts the page will get refreshed and Flash will appear on any following visits to the domain

Latest Backlash against Adobe Flash


The move is said to be the latest in on-going backlash against Adobe Flash and the platform was used to create animations, web pages as well as games from the early 2000s. However, it has been slowly replaced with more open web standards. Adobe had said, in November, that it was time for developers to move away from using Flash. The company had mentioned in a blog post that they encourage content creators to build with new web standards and would continue to focus on offering the best tools and services for designers as well as developers in creating amazing content for the web.

In July 2015, Mozilla had blocked all the versions of Flash in its Firefox browser. During the time Mozilla had said that Flash would stay blocked till Adobe releases a version which was not being actively exploited by publicly known susceptibilities and the block had been lifted few days thereafter. The death of Flash had been slow and painful with Google now planning to deal with another blow.

Google has plans to begin blocking most of Flash content with Chrome and the changeover is targeted to the end of the year. Under its existing vision, almost every website would be having Flash content blocked by default and visitors will still be capable of enabling Flash content on a site-by-site basis though would have to specially opt to do so. Flash has been a threat on battery life and is constantly found to have severe security errors and hence its ultimate disappearance would be accepted.

No comments:

Post a comment

Note: only a member of this blog may post a comment.