Wednesday, 7 August 2013

Samsung Be The First Producing 3D Vertical NAND Flash With 1 Terabit



After more than ten years of research, Samsung managed to conventional flash memory with 3D structures to public. Even earlier the chips have only 16 GB of capacity, but that should change soon. Almost simultaneously with the crossbar of RRAM also flash leader Samsung has announced a breakthrough in the production of non-volatile semiconductor memories. The company continues to further increase capacity on three-dimensional structures, but they are configured differently than the Trigates from Intel. Said Samsung "3D NAND Vertical" or NAND V-method is based on the new etching method, can be constructed with up to 24 layers of the memory devices with conventional NAND flash. In this case, proprietary cell structures are used. That the cells are described but unlike most flash memory, Samsung has already mentioned. The company uses the method "Charge Trap Flash" already in some other chips is used since 2002. The cell is first filled with a load and is not directly, and then the controller would have to wait, but the information is previously stored in a charge trap.

Samsung expects this to double the write speed compared to NAND flash that works with the more widely used floating gates. But the main factor for the increase in storage density is the production of several layers. Previously scaled flash memory at this level was primarily through reductions of the structure width. Multiple layers were mainly problems with crosstalk between the lines to control and these will now have solved by Samsung. How many layers of the first fabricated chip in series with V-NAND is, and when it is available Samsung only knows. According to the company that he is already produced in large numbers with 20-nanometer technology, so it should still be available in 2013. Samsung will use the 128 Gigabit large chips, which corresponds to 16 GB, in all common areas of use of fast flash, including SSDs. In future versions it will be up to 1 Terabit can be accommodated on a single chip, which corresponds to 128 GB.

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