Wednesday, 6 November 2013

Li-Fi A New Technology For High Speed Data Transmission With LED



Li -Fi
A group of researchers based in the UK has just made a significant breakthrough in their attempt to develop a system of “visual communication by light," a way to transmit data to the Internet using LEDs.

 This technology has tried for several years; it is the Li -Fi, a technique that uses light sources like a Morse code to transmit binary code to a receiver. But now, researchers have been able to achieve a transfer rate of 10 gigabits record, ten times faster than the fastest fiber optic connections that are used by Google for data transmission.

These speeds were permitted by the use of micro LED flashing quickly to communicate in binary code. Researchers have associated red, green and blue LEDs to recreate a white light and increase the amount of information transferred without any hurdles simultaneously.

The solution could replace the wireless Internet connections communicating by radio, it has its advantages as well as drawbacks. First of all the connection depends on the amount of light that passes from the LED to a receiver, but still does not require a direct line of sight.

You can bounce the signal using mirrors, or even simple walls. Drawback, the connection cannot pass through walls or opaque materials. It seeks to be particularly attractive to create various secure or restricted areas. It's been almost 10 years various teams working on Li -Fi technology, earlier this month, a team of Chinese scientists have achieved a speed of 150 megabits only with bulbs.

NASA is also working on its own Li -Fi system based on the use of a high-powered laser capable of transmitting data at high speed over long distances and to other planets. As said Dr. Harald Haas, originally the work cited above, and the new speed record transfer, the interest of Li -Fi is that everyone is potentially already partially equipped , and the bulbs become multifunction today, they serve light point, wireless transmitter and means of communication, as an access point to Li -Fi, and, with a modest investment.

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